Monday, July 2, 2012

How To: Forging an “ugly” face on the end of a square bar.

These are fun. I use them on the ends of blacksmith knives a lot, to add detail and give the knives a bit of character.

(Note: All steps are done hot, though not shown in the pix.)

#1. Forge all four corners in on one end, tapering and blending into the length of the bar.

#2. Shoulder the end over the edge of the anvil to form the brow and snout.

#3. Punch the eyes.

#4 and #5. Punch the nostrils with an oval punch and cut a slit for the mouth with a slightly curved chisel.

#6. Make an indentation for the teeth with a flat faced punch.

#7. Punch the spaces between the teeth with a slightly curved chisel and wire bush to clean up.

Here’s an example of one of my blacksmith knives with an “ugly” on the end.

10 comments:

  1. Awesome,Time for me to get busy making the tools and Jigs I need.
    1.Fullering tool.
    2.Little punches for those.
    3.A jig like you put in your Vise for those faces.
    4.Hardy tool for bending.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Jeffro. The vice jig isn’t absolutely necessary, but it does help support and stabilize the work while you are doing some of the punching and chiseling. The main thing is that the piece is held securely and doesn’t move around too much while you’re trying to work on it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T, How about a photo of the holder your using and explain how it works.

      Delete
    2. R, glad you found your way onto the blog. If you mean the vice jig under #3. and #4.,… the main support platform is from fairly substantial stock (half inch plate) for strength. The appendage at the bottom is welded to the platform piece so that when you clamp it in the vice, it holds the jig and the piece you are working on simultaneously. The one in the pix was actually for a larger vice with wider jaws, so it overlaps on one end. It still works though. I use it mostly for doing the eyes and nostrils, but not the mouth. The bottom jaw of the mouth needs to be able to bend downwards. The platform would block it. If the neck bends while doing the mouth, I straighten it with a wooden forging baton and wooden anvil, so as not to ding it up or bend the bottom jaw/mouth shut.

      Delete
  3. T, After I posted that I spotted the photo's of the jig. I like how the jig and the work are held with the vice.

    I've been forging a Moai head. I do a little bit and get to a point where I have to stop and make a new tool. It will probably be awhile before I get good at it. I am feeling more comfortable doing it. Sure helps to be fast. Been thinking of rearranging my forge and anvil. Also thinking of raising the smaller anvil up another foot higher so I can see what I'm doing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. totally great Is that a 3/4" mild steel bar stock for the ugly face?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Duke, it's forged from 3/4 round W2 steel, squared up first.

      Thanks.

      Delete
    2. The top example is from a RR spike with the head cut off.

      Delete
  5. Do you put the twist in the handle after forging the blade?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Put the twist in before forging the blade.

      Delete